Back to All Events

MINDFULNESS IN THE WOODS 🍁

beautiful-autumn-leaf-optimised.jpg

An introduction to Mindfulness with nature as an aid and stimulus for learners to improve their health & well-being through a stronger connection to ourselves and nature. Our qualified and experienced tutors will take you through a range of activities aimed at giving you techniques to take forward in practising Mindfulness in your own time. All this will take place in the grounds of the Harwarden Estate against the backdrop of the woodlands, orchards and fields.

The session will include; walking, body scans, mindfulness exercises, nature awareness, using animal senses and nature connection.

This session is suitable for anyone over the age of 18. The class runs for 3 hours, from 10am until 1pm and costs £30 per person.

“Look deep into nature and you will understand everything” Einstein.

So, What are the Benefits of Mindfulness?

Studies have shown the following;

• General happiness and contentment

• Positive emotions leading to greater physical longevity and resilience

• Reduction in anxiety, depression and irritability

• Improved functioning of cognitive faculties, memory, reaction time and mental stamina

• Improved immune system responses

• Greater harmony in relationships

• Stress relief, including a reduction in high blood pressure

• Better ability to manage pain

• An aid to recovery for Addiction and rehabilitation programmes

The term “mindfulness” does not refer to a single practice, but to a range of practice based approaches seeking to focus an individual’s mind and attention on breathing and patterns of thought as a means to managing emotions, feelings, habitual patterns of behaviour and unregulated critical reactions to events.

Running through all these approaches and therapies we practice an increased ‘awareness’ of the self and the environment, ‘taking notice’ of the present thoughts and conditions, including one’s surroundings and how these impact on the body.

Why Run This Session in the Woods?

Environmental psychologists have insisted that the physical and psychological problems of modern society are associated with a disconnection between human beings and their natural environment.

Humans are “hard-wired”through evolution to hold an emotional and psychological attachment to nature. Placing people apart from nature disrupts our connection with nature and can lead to negative impacts on wellbeing.

“Shinrin-yoku”, which can be defined as “taking in the forest atmosphere” or forest bathing, has been receiving increasing attention in Japan in recent years for its capacity to provide relaxation and reduce stress. Scientific studies have shown certain stress indicators, such as cortisol levels and sympathetic nervous system is lowered when time is spent in a forest as compared with an urban environment.

Mindfulness in natural settings is a growing movement.

March 16 @ 10:00 am - 1:00 pm £30